Category Archives: Music & internet radio

Proposed Digital Rights Agency. Comment now.

Lord Carter’s office have issued a proposal for the Digital Rights Agency referred to in the Digital Britain report. The consultation is open until 30th March.

WriteToReply have a site for you to comment on the proposal in detail.

You can download the proposal and read the press release from the Intellectual Property Office.

To comment go to http://writetoreply.org/strawman/

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News: tweet petit

guardiantech Google and PRS in headlock as music videos pulled from YouTube http://bit.ly/1SAvr6

Finally: Oxenford on US webcastcast royalty settlement http://bit.ly/fLrVH  US internet radio stations need to file with SoundExchange by 2 April or pay CRB rates

Big Picture: London from above at night http://bit.ly/aHr9 That’s a lot of lightbulbs. Exhilarating, yes. Sustainable energy use?

Big Picture photo journalism: Cambodia and its War Tribunal http://bit.ly/LhRvJ

Cambodia: how do you visualize 1.4 million dead? http://bit.ly/bOJnn Keep scrolling.

Oxford Media Convention 2009, IPPR, transcripts and audio Andy Burnham MP, Ed Vaizey MP, Ed Richards OFCOM http://bit.ly/1oR3O

New York Times <has a future> as a news and information platform http://developer.nytimes.com/

New York Times is experimenting with an open API http://bit.ly/MMh3o

Don’t forget Tofu (Mac only). Reflows text in columns from any document, system-wide. Simple, improves quality of life http://bit.ly/zbNN

Readability: a bookmarklet which strips the junk from web pages. Reclaim the web for reading  http://bit.ly/NaRbu

Phorm legal pressure on press criticism. Libel lawyers detect inaccuracies. Stories pulled. The Reg  http://bit.ly/g8HY6

Ofcom boss backs Phorm advertising model. Privacy traded for broadband investment. No thanks. http://bit.ly/6EGIs

The Atlantic on the fate of newspaper journalism. Bleak prospect http://bit.ly/2p2409

Comment on Digital Britain report by 12th March

Cut ‘n paste to your mailing list or blog

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The Digital Britain Interim Report sets out a blueprint for the future of media in the UK.

The deadline for public response to the Report is 12th March.

You can easily comment through the Write To Reply site.

http://writetoreply.org/digitalbritain/

Comment a lot or a little, but do it soon.

What is Write To Reply? A site for commenting on public reports in detail.  Texts are broken down into their respective sections for easier consumption. Rather than comment on the text as a whole, you are encouraged to direct comments to specific paragraphs.

An official Digital Britain discussion site is now available. WriteToReply comments are being fed through and displayed on the front page.

NESTA hosted a panel session with Lord Carter on “Delivering Digital Britain”. You can watch video or hear a recording of the session here: Delivering Digital Britain.

What do other people think? A page of industry reactions from The Guardian 

Carter Report on Digital Britain

Download the report for print and offline reading

No extension of copyright exemption for mashups

“The Government has responded to a consultation paper published by the European Commission on copyright reform. That consultation asks whether the European Union’s Copyright Directive should be amended to introduce exemptions for ‘user-created content’. User-created content can include individuals’ use of professionally-produced music, film, video or images for a new or different purpose to the original.

The Government rejected proposed changes that would exempt such users of copyrighted material from restrictions in copyright law.”

The response cites Creative Commons and the agreement between MCPS-PRS (now PRS for music) and YouTube to license use of music.

Government’s recommendation is for improved forms of licensing by copyright holders which allow for re-use, rather than a reduction in the scope of copyright.

UK opposes copyright exemptions for mash-ups

via Out-law.com, with link to the response PDF http://bit.ly/XDAC2

PRS for music   http://www.prsformusic.com/

Digital Britain: watch and listen

The Digital Britain report is open to comment until 12th March.

On 24th February NESTA hosted a conference on delivering Digital Britain. Many of the key players were present. Video and audio is now available.

It is an extraordinary opportunity to see the development of public policy enacted. Watch and listen.

NESTA delivering Digital Britain

I’ve seen Carter’s speech called ‘defensive’. Well, maybe. His central point though, is developing government policy: it is a report of government, not to government. Henceforth we will refer to ‘the Digital Britain report’, not ‘the Carter report’.

He summarises the report as covering three main areas: infrastructure, content and legal protection. Two further issues are the delivery of public services and a universal public service obligation for broadband. The widely criticised 2MB recommendation refers to a minimum standard for accessing public services, not a base level speed for internet access.

Throughout he is making the case for public intervention. A public policy framework is necessary for investment.

When he talks about content he is talking about television programming. The tactical / strategic distinction is about preserving some existing providers. Channel 4 is mentioned.

On legal protection (filesharing, DRM)  he says they have their ‘least formed ideas’ and are seeking engagement from other people.

Neil Berkett (Virgin Media) and Peter Bazalgette, (of Big Brother, Endemol fame) both ably represent their commercial interests. Bazalgette  repeats his view, heard in the recent BBC programme  Media Revolution (previous post) that tracking users’ viewing habits is a great opportunity for broadcasters and that legislation on product placement is a restrictive burden which should be removed. For overseas viewers: ‘knock heads together’ is just an expression.

Carter quotes a piece by Philip Stevens in the FT, in part to draw attention to an omission: the importance of public policy in developing next-generation infrastructure.

“On two things, everyone should be able to agree; first, the completion of the switchover to digital broadcasting in 2012 and the rapid advent of high-speed broadband transmission will overturn completely what remains of a broadcasting ecosystem created midway through the past century; second, high-quality news, current affairs, regional programming and home-grown drama and comedy will continue to demand substantial public subsidy.”

Financial Times

The rest is about what Stevens sees as the increasing monopoly power of the BBC.

Mark Thompson (BBC) wasn’t at NESTA.

Some context: as TV advertising revenues plummet due to recession and competition from the web, everyone in broadcasting wants a slice of the licence fee.

If it helps to visualise the different interests as personalities, try this

Public Service broadcasting in pictures

NESTA is the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts ‘a unique and independent body with a mission to make the UK more innovative.’