Public data mapping

Public data news

The Guardian’s Free Our Data campaign is a good source for policy and legal developments in the use of public data. Usually covered in the Technology edition, web and print versions, on Thursdays. They also have a blog: freeourdata

A recent Guardian piece by Michael Cross covers significant advances in freeing access to two publicly funded datasets: crime and postcodes. Every neighbourhood in England and Wales will have interactive crime maps online by the end of this year. Royal Mail has made it’s postcode address file of 28 million addresses available for the Show us a better way competition.

UK crime and postcode information edge ever closer to freedom

showusabetterway.co.uk

Previous post on the Show us a better way competition

More on representation: there are some previous posts on data mapping on this site.

mapping, GIS, disease

also lecture notes User Interface 05/06 if you are a student here.

 

Research papers from UCL

Audit Commission Neighbourhood crime and anti-social behaviour

 

University College London projects

Spatial-literacy.org

http://www.spatial-literacy.org/

 

E-Society Classification is a detailed classification of all of Great Britain’s neighbourhoods, based on information about levels of awareness of information and communications technologies, usage patterns, and attitudes to their effects upon quality of life.

e-society profiler

The London Profiler application is a platform on which public sector data about London can be displayed and searched through a common interface. The navigation should be familiar to users as it is based on the Google Maps API

London profiler

 

Software

The GMapCreator is a freeware application designed to make thematic mapping using Google Maps simpler.

GMap creator

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2 thoughts on “Public data mapping”

  1. Welcome, Colin. Is your post automatically generated?
    We could take SpotCrime.com as a case study in the use of crime data by a private company.
    People may like to take a look and comment.

  2. It is important to emphasize that the data should be entirely free for anyone or any company to utilize. We at SpotCrime.com believe that there will be additional applications discovered beyond mapping by making crime incident data fully accessible.

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