Category Archives: UK copyright

Digital Economy Bill

JP Rangaswami to the music industry: The Digital Economy Bill: Be Careful What You Wish For

 

BBC: Call for ‘fuller’ debate on Digital Economy Bill

 

The debate in Parliament

Download Tera consultants Building a Digital Economy report PDF

“The substitution rate represents the number of units that would likely have been sold if piracy were eliminated.” TERA consultants

This is not research, it’s 68 pages of projection based on an assumption about lost revenue by Tera consultants.

International Chamber of Commerce funds Business Action to Stop Counterfeiting & Piracy, who commissioned the TERA consultants study.

 

 

Stephen Timms quoting abjectly bad ICC funded lobbying ‘study’ 9:42 PM Apr 6th

MPs at the debate on 6th April 2010 07:30:10 PM pastebin

http://debillitated.heroku.com 40MPs at #debill debate

 

Digital economy bill: government forced to drop key clauses Guardian

 

Did my MP show up or not? http://www.didmympshowupornot.com/

 

Links to 13th June

 

The week in links
Education resources, open access, copyright, bad research and lobbying, life without newspapers- insight from the1940s, Twitter hype vs the numbers, browser innovation, Digital Britain, life without broadband, French anti-filesharing law overturned.

The week in links

Education resources, open access, copyright, bad research and lobbying, life without newspapers- insight from the1940s, Twitter hype vs the numbers, browser innovation, Digital Britain, life without broadband, French anti-filesharing law overturned.

Continue reading

tweetness

Argentine philosophy professor Horacio Potel faces criminal charges and a possible jail sentence for posting  translations of Jaques Derrida’s work to his website for his students. Via Boing Boing  http://bit.ly/u38aD and  http://bit.ly/ZLPTg More http://bit.ly/2OL2D

New Zealand scraps Controversial ’3 Strikes’ Anti-Piracy Law which would have led to alleged copyright infringers being disconnected from the internet http://tinyurl.com/d86ra6

A major new report published by the Rowntree Trust on the database state via Open Democracy http://is.gd/owLG

guardiantech: Channel 4′s 4ip fund invests in discussion tool Yoosk http://bit.ly/10KIt  ‘famous people. you ask. we connect. they answer’ Based in Warwickshire and Vietnam. About Yoosk . Download pdf http://yoosk.com/about-us.aspx

Music Week on Digital Rights Agency http://tinyurl.com/cbskeh. Geoff Taylor of the BPI would like government  enforcement against filesharing, but cheaper.

“…the [digital] rights agency is ‘an answer looking for a question’…without a clear remit or responsibility.” http://bit.ly/dright

No case for copyright extension on sound recordings. Academics’ letter to Times. http://bit.ly/1ilR3r

Downloadable font formats for the Web (article): http://dbaron.org/log/20090317-fonts An example of thinking about how the rights of creators can be respected without  resorting to DRM.  Exactly the kind of pragmatic discussion we should be having about other forms of creative work.

Selection

Newspapers: Seattle Post-Intelligencer ends printing. Staff cuts, continues as web-only publication http://bit.ly/L1OnJ

iPod headphones aren´t DRMed, just controlled by a proprietary chip that you have to license  http://bit.ly/YdnM4

Guardian Tech OFCOM sets out challenge of broadband Britain http://bit.ly/SsqGL

More James Boyle and ‘How extending copyright term in sound recordings actually works’ with link to PDF http://bit.ly/YdnM4

Guardian Tech Richard Smith. Good summary of James Boyle’s case for The Public Domain. http://bit.ly/qEM2

UK IPO office: since July ISPs issuing 1,000 notifications a week on behalf of copyright holders to P2P users http://bit.ly/8baGq

EU copyright extension: corporate gain, public cost

Academics warn of the dangers and costs of extending copyright term on sound recordings to 70 or 95 years. The European Parliament votes on 23rd March.

Extracts

“Such an extension, from 50 to 95 years (or perhaps 70 years), will harm Europe’s culture and economy.

The European Parliament is being asked to remove sound recordings from the public domain for another generation, ostensibly in order to benefit performers. In reality, copyright extension will serve the shareholders of four major multinational companies that control the valuable recordings of the 1960s (Universal, Warner, Sony and EMI).

It is not surprising that many performers’ organisations and collecting societies support the Proposed Directive. They do not have to carry the costs – which are likely to exceed EURO 1 billion to the general public …. Many performers also do not appear to understand that the proposal would lead to a redistribution of income from living to dead artists.

If Europe wishes to keep its ability to innovate, it must not lock in the current industry structure at a moment of great technological change, it must not inhibit digital creators and archives in the exploration of music – music which has been paid for once already, during the existing term!

The public will not be fooled. If copyright law, cynically, departs from its purpose, piracy becomes an easy option.”

Download press release PDF 

Via Open Rights Group 

Studies of copyright term and an open letter to David Lammy, Minister for Intellectual Property (and co- presenter of the UK Digital Rights Agency proposal.)

“ it is hard to discern a compelling ‘moral’ case for a proposal whose prime effect is to benefit major label shareholders and a few, already highly successful, artists while imposing significantly greater costs on new creators, the general listening public and the custodians of our cultural heritage.”

Bournemouth University Centre for Intellectual Property Policy & Management

Proposed Digital Rights Agency. Comment now.

Lord Carter’s office have issued a proposal for the Digital Rights Agency referred to in the Digital Britain report. The consultation is open until 30th March.

WriteToReply have a site for you to comment on the proposal in detail.

You can download the proposal and read the press release from the Intellectual Property Office.

To comment go to http://writetoreply.org/strawman/

Comment on Digital Britain report by 12th March

Cut ‘n paste to your mailing list or blog

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The Digital Britain Interim Report sets out a blueprint for the future of media in the UK.

The deadline for public response to the Report is 12th March.

You can easily comment through the Write To Reply site.

http://writetoreply.org/digitalbritain/

Comment a lot or a little, but do it soon.

What is Write To Reply? A site for commenting on public reports in detail.  Texts are broken down into their respective sections for easier consumption. Rather than comment on the text as a whole, you are encouraged to direct comments to specific paragraphs.

An official Digital Britain discussion site is now available. WriteToReply comments are being fed through and displayed on the front page.

NESTA hosted a panel session with Lord Carter on “Delivering Digital Britain”. You can watch video or hear a recording of the session here: Delivering Digital Britain.

What do other people think? A page of industry reactions from The Guardian 

Carter Report on Digital Britain

Download the report for print and offline reading

No extension of copyright exemption for mashups

“The Government has responded to a consultation paper published by the European Commission on copyright reform. That consultation asks whether the European Union’s Copyright Directive should be amended to introduce exemptions for ‘user-created content’. User-created content can include individuals’ use of professionally-produced music, film, video or images for a new or different purpose to the original.

The Government rejected proposed changes that would exempt such users of copyrighted material from restrictions in copyright law.”

The response cites Creative Commons and the agreement between MCPS-PRS (now PRS for music) and YouTube to license use of music.

Government’s recommendation is for improved forms of licensing by copyright holders which allow for re-use, rather than a reduction in the scope of copyright.

UK opposes copyright exemptions for mash-ups

via Out-law.com, with link to the response PDF http://bit.ly/XDAC2

PRS for music   http://www.prsformusic.com/

Digital Britain: watch and listen

The Digital Britain report is open to comment until 12th March.

On 24th February NESTA hosted a conference on delivering Digital Britain. Many of the key players were present. Video and audio is now available.

It is an extraordinary opportunity to see the development of public policy enacted. Watch and listen.

NESTA delivering Digital Britain

I’ve seen Carter’s speech called ‘defensive’. Well, maybe. His central point though, is developing government policy: it is a report of government, not to government. Henceforth we will refer to ‘the Digital Britain report’, not ‘the Carter report’.

He summarises the report as covering three main areas: infrastructure, content and legal protection. Two further issues are the delivery of public services and a universal public service obligation for broadband. The widely criticised 2MB recommendation refers to a minimum standard for accessing public services, not a base level speed for internet access.

Throughout he is making the case for public intervention. A public policy framework is necessary for investment.

When he talks about content he is talking about television programming. The tactical / strategic distinction is about preserving some existing providers. Channel 4 is mentioned.

On legal protection (filesharing, DRM)  he says they have their ‘least formed ideas’ and are seeking engagement from other people.

Neil Berkett (Virgin Media) and Peter Bazalgette, (of Big Brother, Endemol fame) both ably represent their commercial interests. Bazalgette  repeats his view, heard in the recent BBC programme  Media Revolution (previous post) that tracking users’ viewing habits is a great opportunity for broadcasters and that legislation on product placement is a restrictive burden which should be removed. For overseas viewers: ‘knock heads together’ is just an expression.

Carter quotes a piece by Philip Stevens in the FT, in part to draw attention to an omission: the importance of public policy in developing next-generation infrastructure.

“On two things, everyone should be able to agree; first, the completion of the switchover to digital broadcasting in 2012 and the rapid advent of high-speed broadband transmission will overturn completely what remains of a broadcasting ecosystem created midway through the past century; second, high-quality news, current affairs, regional programming and home-grown drama and comedy will continue to demand substantial public subsidy.”

Financial Times

The rest is about what Stevens sees as the increasing monopoly power of the BBC.

Mark Thompson (BBC) wasn’t at NESTA.

Some context: as TV advertising revenues plummet due to recession and competition from the web, everyone in broadcasting wants a slice of the licence fee.

If it helps to visualise the different interests as personalities, try this

Public Service broadcasting in pictures

NESTA is the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts ‘a unique and independent body with a mission to make the UK more innovative.’